Market Trends & Research

Vegetable Consumption, Dietary Guidelines, and Agricultural Production in New York State: Implications for Local Food Economies

http://hortmgt.dyson.cornell.edu/pdf/smart_marketing/peters2-03.pdf

Christian Peters, Nelson Bills, Jennifer Wilkins, R. David Smith, Cornell University

Local food economies that feature well-developed demand responses by local producers to regional consumers’ needs are gaining attention as a means for boosting agriculture and food production in New York State. Concurrent with this interest in local agriculture is a national concern over the health effects of American food consumption patterns and the capacity of agriculture to provide nutritious diets. This article reports on a study that merges these areas of inquiry in the context of a nutritionally and economically important agricultural sector: New York State vegetable production. 3 important and heretofore unanswered questions are examined. First, how does New York State vegetable production compare with the vegetable consumption by New Yorkers? Second, how does production and consumption of vegetables compare with the recommendations on the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Guide Pyramid? Finally, what implications, if any, do these comparisons have for New York State agriculture?

Article is a Word document. For the complete report in PDF format, click here.


Local Foods and Local Agriculture: A Survey of Attitudes Among Northeastern Consumers

http://www.smallfarms.cornell.edu/pages/resources/pdfs/AttitudeSurvey.rtf

Jennifer L. Wilkins, Jennifer Bokaer-Smith, Duncan Hilchey, Cornell University

This survey reports Northeastern consumers’ consumption of fruits and vegetables, perceptions of and preference for local produce, seasonal eating patterns (including familiarity with winter produce items), and attitudes toward agricultural issues.


An Analysis of Vegetable Farms’ Direct Marketing Activities

http://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/jlofdr/27626.html

Wen-fei L. Uva, Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, March 2002

A summary of the direct marketing vegetable farm survey results (funded by New York State Vegetable Growers Association’s fresh market vegetable research fund). This summary discusses the seasonality, methods, products, barriers, and opportunities of New York State vegetable and fruit farmers that direct market their products. Publication is inPDF format.

Publication price per hard copy is $5. For additional copies, contact:
Wen-fei Uva
Sr. Extension Associate
456 Warren Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853-7801


Farmers and Their Diversified Horticultural Marketing Strategies: An Educational Video on Innovative Marketing

http://www.uvm.edu/vtvegandberry/Videos/marketvideo.htm

Vern Grubinger, University of Vermont Extension, Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education

Because farmers face a competitive and volatile market, growing a high-quality product may no longer be enough to guarantee financial success. This video shares the experience of managers of 8 farms, who show how the right combination of products, customers, and marketing strategies can help build financially rewarding businesses. Farmers and Their Diversified Horticultural Marketing Strategies profiles vegetable, fruit, and horticultural growers in Maine, Massachusetts, New York, and Vermont who have pursued a variety of rewarding approaches adapted to their unique products and conditions. The growers interviewed successfully sell their products through a broad range of retail and wholesale outlets: roadside stands, farmers markets, large-scale community-supported agriculture organizations, multiple markets, Internet sales, pick-your-own businesses, restaurant sales, and wholesale cooperatives. The growers summarize the history of their marketing efforts, explain why their chosen strategies suit their products, geographic conditions, and personal goals, and reflect on how they have developed good relationships with loyal customers. The video will help both new and established growers and their advisors carefully consider the marketing options for their particular situations that can enhance income and promote the sustainability of their farms.

49 minutes. $15 if mailed within continental U.S. To order, complete the order form and send with payment to:
Center for Sustainable Agriculture
University of Vermont
63 Carrigan Dr.
Burlington, VT 05405-0004
Phone: (802) 656-5459
E-mail: 


Pasture Raised Products Message and Strategy: Consumer Focus Group Study

http://www.practicalfarmers.org/resource/PFIResource_64.pdf

Kim Shelquist, Iowa State University, October/November 2002

6 focus groups were held across the Midwest on behalf of FoodRoutes and the Midwest Collaborators. These groups were held in support of the development of key marketing messages for use by producers of pasture raised products and to further assist producers in planning marketing efforts for these products. Publication is in PDF format.


Attracting Consumers with Locally Grown Products

http://www.farmprofitability.org/local.pdf

The North Central Initiative for Small Farm Profitability, October 2001

A study of consumer attributes and purchasing patterns in 4 mid-western states. Includes consumer responses to organic, “all-natural,” and local, with a special emphasis on meats and poultry, including pastured poultry. Publication is in PDF format.

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