Grazing

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General | Dairy | Non-Dairy Livestock | Pastured Poultry | Organizations


Cornell University Poisonous Plants Home Page

http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/index.html

Department of Animal Science, Cornell University Reference that includes plant images, pictures of affected animals, and presentations concerning the botany, chemistry, toxicology, diagnosis, and prevention of poisoning of animals by plants and other natural flora (fungi, etc.).


Northeast Pasture Consortium

http://www.umaine.edu/grazingguide/

“Linking Graziers, Research, and Extension”

The site gives you access to Research Summaries, Extension Resources, and Links to other grazing websites.


Graze NY

http://www.grazeny.com/

A joint project among Congressman James T. Walsh, 25th District, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, Cornell Cooperative Extension, and County Soil and Water Conservation Districts. Graze NY’s mission is to promote and assist in the successful adoption of grazing for area livestock farmers. Graze NY partners offer technical and educational assistance to producers who would like to implement grazing systems and the needed support for optimum management of established grazing systems.


Pasture Contest Study Guide

http://agebb.missouri.edu/mfgc/contest/condition1.htm

Although this Guide was developed specifically for students studying for a contest in pasture evaluation, the material it contains is invaluable for pasture managers to learn to evaluate their grassland resource.

The Guide was developed by the Seneca Trail Resource Conservation and Development Council, Inc. in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service; NY Cooperative Extension Service; New York Federation of Resource Conservation and Development Councils; County Conservation Districts; NY Association of Conservation Districts; and the NY Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative Steering Committee, sponsors the New York Grassland Evaluation Contest. Many National Resource Professionals have contributed to this contest, which started in Missouri in 1991. This third edition of the contest study guide was originally developed by the Missouri Forage and Grassland Council and was adapted for use in New York.


University of Maine Cooperative Extension Online Pasture Management Course

http://www.umaine.edu/umext/pasture/

This online course is available for free for anyone to take at any time. It covers everything from the intial planning stages to watering and fencing and forage management.


Eat Wild

http://www.eatwild.com/

A clearinghouse for information about pasture-based farming, with the goals of linking consumers with farmers of grass-fed meats and providing comprehensive and accurate information about the benefits of raising animals on pasture.


Graze

http://www.grazeonline.com/

Formerly Pasture Talk, Joel McNair, ed. Graze is published 10 times a year in newspaper format. A lot of emphasis is placed on detailed interviews with farmers about their grazing techniques, problems, solutions, and more. This publication is mostly about dairy (cow) grazing, with an emphasis on the northern U.S. (but not to the exclusion of other regions). There are occasional articles on other ruminants. One year is $30, two years $54. Contact: Graze P.O. Box 48 Belleville, WI 53508 Phone: (608) 455-3311 E-mail: 


The Stockman Grass Farmer Magazine

http://www.stockmangrassfarmer.com/sgf/

If your business is turning grass into beef, lamb, or milk, you’ll enjoy reading The Stockman Grass Farmer, a publication devoted entirely to the art and science of turning grass into cash flow. The Stockman Grass Farmer serves as an information network for grassland farmers sharing the latest in intensive grazing technology and pasture management. $32 for 1 year, $56 for 2. To order a subscription online, click here

http://www.stockmangrassfarmer.net/Subscribe.html

Grazing Management Farm*A*Syst

http://www.soil.ncsu.edu/assist/grazing/

Farm*A*Syst, North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service Comprehensive information on grazing livestock and water quality.


Brassica Production for Pasture

http://cropsoil.psu.edu/extension/facts/agfact33.pdf

Marvin Hall and Jerry Jung. Penn State Dept. of Agronomy. Information on varieties of brassica to seed into pasture for longer grazing season.


Introduction to Management Intensive Grazing

Bill Murphy, Center for Sustainable Agriculture, University of Vermont, 1999 An overview of management intensive grazing with practical tips for setting up a grazing system for all classes of ruminant livestock. 8 pages. Single copies free of charge; multiple copies may require S&H fee. To order, contact: UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture Agricultural Engineering Bldg. 63 Carrigan Dr. Burlington, VT 05405 Phone: (802) 656-5459 E-mail: 


Watering Systems for Livestock

John Jemison, Chris Jones, Center for Sustainable Agriculture, University of Vermont, 1997 An overview of watering systems for livestock, particularly useful in management intensive grazing systems. 4 pages. Single copies free; multiple copies may require S&H fee. To order, contact: UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture Agricultural Engineering Bldg. 63 Carrigan Dr. Burlington, VT 05405 Phone: (802) 656-5459 E-mail:


ATTRA Grass Farming Resources

http://attra.ncat.org/livestock.html#Grass

Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas ATTRA is one of the best sources of information on non-traditional agricultural enterprises. It provides many publications, both online and in print, for those interested in grass farming, including:

  • Sustainable Pasture Management — Alice Beetz
    http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/sustpast.html
  • Assessing the Pasture Soil Resource — Preston Sullivan
    http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/pastsoil.html
  • Dung Beetle Benefits in the Pasture Ecosystem — Michelle Thomas
    http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/dungbeetle.html

These and other ATTRA publications can also be obtained for free by calling ATTRA at 1-800-346-9140, Monday-Friday, from 7am to 7pm CST.


Grazing Discussion Groups in New York State


Chautauqua County Graziers

Farmer Contact: Tom Ormond: (716) 267-7855 Extension Contact: Lisa Kempisty


Warren County Graziers (PA)

Farmer Contact: Jane Burlingame: (814) 757-8540 Warren County: (814) 563-3125


Tioga County Graziers

Farmer Contact: Marvin Moyer: (607) 687-4053


Tri County Graziers

Farmer Contact: Doug Davidson: (716) 492-1090 NRCS Contact: Don Wild: (716) 676-5111


The Highlanders

Farmer Contact: John Stolzfus: (607) 356-3272 Extension Contact: Tom Parmenter: (716) 268-7644


Shawmut Grasslanders

Farmer Contact: Harv Lacy: (607) 545-6527 Extension Contact: Tom Parmenter: (716) 268-7644


Niagara/Orleans County Grazing Group

Farmer Contact: Brad Bentley: (716) 765-2874


Herkimer/Otsego Pasture Profit Group

Farmer Contact: Charlie Treat: (315) 894-2840 CCE of Herkimer: Kevin Ganoe: (315) 866-7920


Bradford County Grazing Network, PA

Extension Contact: Mark Madden: (570) 265-2896 or 928-8941



2000 Dairy Farm Business Summary: Intensive Grazing Farms in New York

http://aem.cornell.edu/outreach/extensionpdf/eb0113.pdf

George Conneman, James Grace et al, Department of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, September 2001 The primary objective of the dairy farm business summary, DFBS, is to help farm managers improve the business and financial management of their business through appropriate use of historical farm data and the application of modern farm business analysis techniques. This information can also be used to establish goals that will enable the business to better meet its objectives. In short, DFBS provides business and financial information needed in identifying and evaluating strengths and weaknesses of the farm business. To obtain a hard copy, contact Faye Butts at (607) 254-7412 or 

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Back to Grass: Farming with Managed Intensive Grazing

Cornell Cooperative Extension, NWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Team This half-hour video explores the application of grazing practices an commercial dairy farms. To order the video, contact: Martha A. Wright Phone: (716) 394-3977 ext. 36 Fax: (716) 394-0377 E-mail: 


Cornell Small Farms Program press releases

  • Let Them Eat Grass!
    http://media.cce.cornell.edu/hosts/agfoodcommunity/pressreleases/01-22-03.doc
  • David Surprenant dairy farm
    http://media.cce.cornell.edu/hosts/agfoodcommunity/pressreleases/02-20-03.doc

Dairy Grazing Farms Financial Summary: Regional/Multi-State Interpretation of Small Farm Data

http://cdp.wisc.edu/pdf/glgnreport_yr4.pdf

Great Lakes Grazing Network, April 2005. This analysis of actual farm financial data from graziers (102 in 2003 and 103 in 2002) in the Great Lakes region provides some insight into the economics of grazing as a dairy system in the northern U.S. The study also confirms that accounting methodology and financial standards are important both in the accuracy and the standardization of comparison values across large geographic areas involving different combinations of production assets and management skills. Publication is in PDF format.


Intensive Grazing versus Conventional Confinement on Small Dairy Farms in Maryland

http://media.cce.cornell.edu/hosts/agfoodcommunity/intgrazvsconvconf.pdf

Dale M. Johnson, Donald M. Schwartz, Stanley W. Fultz, Michael R. Bell, University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Data collected from conventional confinement and intensive grazing dairy operations provides evidence that intensive grazing may be a profitable alternative to help small dairy farms stay in business. Maryland Cooperative Extension is conducting research and education programs to analyze and improve intensive grazing methods and to educate farmers in improving production. Publication is in PDF format

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Management Intensive Rotational Grazing

http://www.pats.wisc.edu/

Program on Agricultural Technology Studies, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison Growing numbers of Wisconsin dairy farmers have reported success using management intensive rotational grazing (MIRG) techniques that rely on pastures as the primary source of forage for their milking herds. PATS surveys indicate that roughly 22 percent of Wisconsin farmers move their herds at least once a week. Those farmers utilizing MIRG report labor savings, a high rate of satisfaction with quality of life, and lower operating costs than confinement operations. Economic studies confirm farmer reports that MIRG offers a viable economic alternative to large-scale, confinement dairy operations.


New York Pasture Association

A producer’s circle that meets once per month to discuss production issues related to pasturing dairy livestock and poultry. Mission statement: “To encourage a diversified, grass-based, agricultural system that furthers the development of healthy families and communities through the creation of economically viable and environmentally sound farms.” Contact Janice Brown at (716) 466-7680 for more information.


The Forgey Files

http://www.ibiblio.org/farming-connection/grazing/forgey/forghome.htm

How-to advice from Indiana’s pioneering seasonal dairy grazer. David Forgey was one of the first in his area to adopt rotational grazing and soon converted his herd to seasonal breeding, freshening in spring to take advantage of peak pasture production. He shares his experiences from grazing basics to high-level management on his site.



Freeze Protection for Solar-powered Livestock Watering Systems

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/freeze.html

Vicki Lynne, Mike Morris, National Center for Appropriate Technology, June 2002 Winter use of a solar pumping system is problematic but possible. Even in areas with mild climates, owners of these sytems must cope with shorter daylight hours and extended periods of overcast skies that can drastically reduce power output. Freezing temperatures pose two main challenges: winterizing a summer-use-only system and freeze-proofing a system intended for winter use.



Poultry Enterprise Budget

http://www.cias.wisc.edu/archives/2003/02/01/poultry_enterprise_budget/index.php

Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems, University of Wisconsin Enterprises like pastured poultry can add to farm income with careful financial planning. CIAS has developed a spreadsheet to help farmers make financial and management decisions about new or existing poutry enterprises. While the budget was developed for a CIAS pastured poultry project, it is applicable to most kinds and sizes of poultry enterprises.


Growing Your Range Poultry Business: An Entrepreneur’s Toolbox

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/PDF/poultrytoolbox.pdf

Anne Fanatico, David Redhage, Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas This toolbox is written for anyone who desires to make a profit from range poultry production, whether by direct-marketing “pastured poultry,” building a processing plant, or working cooperatively with other producers. Publication is in PDF format

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Pastured poultry study addresses broad range of issues

http://www.cias.wisc.edu/archives/1999/12/02/pastured_poultry_study_addresses_broad_range_of_issues/index.php

Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems, University of Wisconsin Information about pastured poultry research at the University of Wisconsin.


Profitable Poultry: Raising Birds on Pasture

http://www.sare.org/bulletin/poultry/

Sustainable Agriculture Network, U.S. Department of Agriculture Profitable Poultry: Raising Birds on Pasture features farmer experiences plus the latest research in a new “how-to” guide to raising chickens and turkeys using pens, movable fencing, and pastures. A Kentucky family nets between 90 cents and $1.50 per pound from Louisville customers for birds raised on pasture. A New Mexico producer who rotates birds across his property year-round has seen drastic improvements to his desert soil. And a Wyoming producer was able to quit a full-time, off-the-farm job to stay home and raise pastured poultry with help from her school-age kids. With those examples and more from around the country, the bulletin touches on the system’s many opportunities to improve profits, environment, and rural family life. With original ideas for marketing poultry products and a page of additional, expert resources, the bulletin offers a jumping-off point for new producers. 16 pages. Free. To order a hard copy, call (301) 504-6422.


Pastured Poultry

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/pasturedpoultry.html

Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas, Heifer Project International This booklet summarizes the experiences of 35 Southern farm families who from 1996-1999 participated in a project titled “Integrating Pastured Poultry into the Farming Systems of Limited Resource Farmers.” The experience proved favorable for 27 of the project families who continue to raise range poultry for home-use and for sale to growing customer bases.


New York Pasture Association

A producer’s circle that meets once per month to discuss production issues related to pasturing dairy livestock and poultry. Mission statement: “To encourage a diversified, grass-based, agricultural system that furthers the development of healthy families and communities through the creation of economically viable and environmentally sound farms.” Contact Janice Brown at (716) 466-7680 for more information.


The American Pastured Poultry Producers Association

http://www.apppa.org/

The APPPA was established in 1997 to assist all pastured poultry producers in North America. APPPA is a clearinghouse for innovations and refinements to the pastured poultry model. APPPA offers the opportunity for people to learn and exchange information about raising poultry on pasture. The American Pastured Poultry Producers Association P.O. Box 1024 Chippewa Falls, WI 54729 Phone: (715) 667-5501 Fax: (715) 667-3044 E-mail: 


Free-Range Poultry

http://www.free-rangepoultry.com/

Introduction to pastured poultry, including budget forms and a full range of books and videos about grass-based poultry production systems from start-up to market.


Pasture Poultry

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PasturePoultry/

Nearly 21,000 searchable e-mail messages are posted about raising poultry on pasture for meat and egg production.



Graze NY

http://www.grazeny.com/

A joint project among Congressman James T. Walsh, 25th District, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, Cornell Cooperative Extension, and County Soil and Water Conservation Districts. Graze NY’s mission is to promote and assist in the successful adoption of grazing for area livestock farmers. Graze NY partners offer technical and educational assistance to producers who would like to implement grazing systems and the needed support for optimum management of established grazing systems.


New York Pasture Association

A producer’s circle that meets once per month to discuss production issues related to pasturing dairy livestock and poultry. Mission statement: “To encourage a diversified, grass-based, agricultural system that furthers the development of healthy families and communities through the creation of economically viable and environmentally sound farms.” Contact Wendy Fast, President, at (585) 335-3439 or for more information.


The American Pastured Poultry Producers Association

http://www.apppa.org/

The APPPA was established in 1997 to assist all pastured poultry producers in North America. APPPA is a clearinghouse for innovations and refinements to the pastured poultry model. APPPA offers the opportunity for people to learn and exchange information about raising poultry on pasture. The American Pastured Poultry Producers Association P.O. Box 1024 Chippewa Falls, WI 54729 Phone: (715) 667-5501 Fax: (715) 667-3044 E-mail: 

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